Monthly Archives: November 2013

November skies

Morning gulls, Hatton

Morning gulls, Hatton

You have got to be there at the right time to get a dramatic sky picture.   Over the past few weeks I have been noticing the beautiful effects in the eastern sky, just before the sun comes up.  Time and time again I have walked down the shop to get the paper, noticed the sky and gone back for my camera, only to discover that I am too late and the effect has gone.   But I was ready this morning!   I took my camera with me as I went out for an early Sunday morning walk with Lily the dog.  I had noticed the interesting silhouette effect of the bare branches of the tree, and using a telephoto lens, I framed it up against the reddening sky.  Just at that moment a flock of gulls flew into the picture.  Luck!  Other pictures I took at the same time, in the same place, but without the birds, look uninspired in comparison.   You have got to be there at the right time.

November morning sky, Hatton.  Not so good without the birds!

November morning sky, Hatton. Not so good without the birds!

After my article last week on winter skies, I thought I would try a few more shots on my November morning walk and managed to take a couple of nice pictures of the morning sky.   But when I tried a shot of the mast and wind turbines on Gallows Hill, the colourhad gone out of the sky and it is not nearly so dramatic.

November morning sky lover the main A90  road, Hatton

November morning sky over the main A90 road, Hatton

November morning sky, Auchlethen

November morning sky, Auchethen

 

Technology on Gallows Hill, Cruden

Technology on Gallows Hill, Cruden

What was dramatic, though, was the group of half a dozen roe deer in the distance, in the field between Auchlethen and the main road.  Lily spotted them, and they spotted Lily.

Lily spottd the deer in the distance.

Lily spottd the deer in the distance.

Roe deer, Auchlethen

Roe deer, Auchlethen

I have been noticing recently how casual the deer seem to be.  They stand and watch you, before sauntering off.   This deer was just on the limit of my camer’s ca[ability, and the light was not great.  the picture will never win any prizes, but it will help me remember the morning of the red sky, the gulls and the deer.

Can you spot four roe deer?

Can you spot four roe deer?

Red sky at night……

Red sky at night: . from the car park near the Longhaven cliffs, November 2013

Red sky at night: from the lay-by near the Longhaven cliffs, November 2013

Last Friday I experienced one of those wonderful winter skies.  The sun had just gone down and I was driving back to Hatton from Peterhead.  The sky was on fire, the texture of the clouds picked out in reds and orange.   It was one of those days when you just had to stop the car and take it all in.  It was also one of those days I wished I had taken my camera with me.   But the camea on my mobile phone turned up trumps.  I stopped at the lay-by over looking the Longhaven cliffs and rested my phone on the top of a rubbish bin.  The result is better than I had hoped for.  You can even see the headlights of the cars heading for Boddam.

That sky brought to mind two other pictures I look a long time ago.  I was working at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary at the time.  My office looked east and at this time of the year from time to time I would see one of those red skies in the morning.   Digging through my old photographs I came across the pictures, taken long before the days of digital cameras.   Film was all there was then, and you had to wait to see the results when the pictures came back from being developed.

The first one was taken in the mid 1990s on a snowy morning, looking out of my office window, with the spire of Beechgrove church silhouetted against the blazing sky.  I have always loved that picture.

Beechgrove Church spire, Aberdeen on a snowy morning in the mid 1970s

Beechgrove Church spire, Aberdeen on a snowy morning in the mid 1970s

The other photograph was taken on the morning of 31 December 1999 and I call it the “Millennium Dawn”.  It reminds me of the panic there was at that time: would all the computers stop working when the Millennium arrived?  The hospital, like the rest of the country was on red alert and all sorts of emergency plans were being prepared.   But that hogmanay morning all that was forgotten as people admired the wonderful dawn.  and of course the so called Millennium Bug was a damp squib – nothing happened!

"Millennium Dawn" -  Sunrise sky from Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, 31 December 1999.  If you look closely you will see the Beechgrove Church spire again.

“Millennium Dawn” – Sunrise sky from Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, 31 December 1999. If you look closely you will see the Beechgrove Church spire again.

Since I am thinking about skies, just a few more pictures of Cruden country skies.  We are so lucky having such a variety in our skies, from the fluffy cumulus clouds of summer to the streaks of sunlight breaking through the grey.

Looking towards Cruden Bay from Gallows Hill.

Looking towards Cruden Bay from Gallows Hill.

Summer evening sky at Cruden Bay.  August 2012

Summer evening sky at Cruden Bay. August 2012

 

Sun breaks through the clouds.  Looking over the Longhaven Cliffs, November 2013

Sun breaks through the clouds. Looking over the Longhaven Cliffs, November 2013

Dramatic clouds over the Hatton field.  March 2912

Dramatic clouds over the Hatton field. March 2912

And just one last sky, a little further away again.  On the shores of the Cromarty Firth, a couple of years ago on a winter walk with the dog.  You can see the lights of Invergordon across the water.   Again a picture captured by the mobile phone.   What did we do before they were invented?

Winter evening looking across the Cromarty Firth to Invergordon.

Winter evening looking across the Cromarty Firth to Invergordon.